About the Trust

The Hollyford Conservation Trust – Te Roopu Manaaki o Whakatipu Waitai – is a charitable trust. We are proud to have the support of the Department of Conservation, iwi, visitors and the many people and organisations who have and continue to contribute to our ongoing efforts.

 

The objective of our trust is to:

  1. Actively protect and enhance native flora and fauna in harmony with cultural, social and recreational values at Martins Bay, lower Hollyford Valley – Whakatipu Waitai – and in other areas that the Trust agrees to for the benefit of the community;
  2. Advocate for the recognition and respect of cultural history and heritage values in the Fiordland region.

The Hollyford Conservation Trust is extremely grateful for the support of all sponsors, benefactors and partners. If you would like to know more about our trust or think you can help please get in touch.

We’d love to hear from you.

The story so far

The Hollyford Conservation Trust was formed in June 2014 to establish a ‘mainland island’ sanctuary in the lower Hollyford Valley, in partnership with the Department of Conservation (DOC) and other stakeholders. The project would involve 2600 hectares of intensive predator and pest control, targeting stoats, rats and possums.

By August 2015 the Trust had established the infrastructure for Stage 1 of its project, a network of traps and bait stations set on a grid over a 900 hectare portion of the 2600 hectare project area.

In March 2016 the Trust completed Stage 2, which extended intensive pest control measures over the remainder of the 2600 hectare project area.

From 2016 until the present day the trust has worked to upgrade the trapping network, completed frequent trap checks including responding to mast year events, conducted weed control, and reintroduced the previously locally extinct species, kakaruai/South Island robin (April 2019). The trustees are constantly reviewing best practice pest and predator control, and work hard to raise the necessary funds to protect this treasured corner of Fiordland.

We want to see a healthy and thriving native ecosystem in the lower Hollyford Valley, with diverse and abundand bird life free from the risk of predation by possums, stoats and rats.

Our Vision

To protect, enhance and restore all native flora and fauna for the enjoyment of all, today and for generations well into the future.

About The Trust

The Hollyford Conservation Trust was formed in June 2014 to establish a ‘mainland island’ sanctuary in the lower Hollyford Valley, in partnership with the Department of Conservation (DOC) and other stakeholders.

Pest control

This project was established in 2014 after local landowners realised the impact introduced pests were having on the Lower Hollyford Valley – the birdsong was gone, and the canopy was collapsing, with the more palatable species such as southern rātā and fuschia being browsed extensively to the point of dieback.

Bird translocations

One of the key long term aspirations of the project is to return species that once lived in the project area but have become locally extinct.

Cliff Broad Tawaki Project

The Cliff Broad Tawaki pest control project is a trapping line along the rocky coastline to the North of Martins Bay to protect Fiordland crested penguins/tawaki during the breeding season.  This project is funded by a generous donation from the Broad family in memory of their father Cliff Broad, who had a special bond with the Hollyford Valley and Martins Bay.

Latest News

2019 annual bird monitoring

2019 annual bird monitoring

The results of the 2019 bird monitoring show birdlife in the valley has increased significantly since intensive pest control began in 2015.

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February 2020 floods in the Hollyford Valley

February 2020 floods in the Hollyford Valley

Early February brought record rainfall to the Hollyford Valley, causing signficant damage to the Hollyford and Milford roads, as well as causing large slips and damage to tracks, huts, and the Trust's own infrastructure. 1,000mm of rain fell in a 60 hour period in...

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